41 – Other Members of the Crowd, and the Strange Things Some of them Do

Fig. 200 – Two-Blue coats filming the arrest (captured in the Sun Arrest Footage); he is still clutching his white thing.

Fig. 200 – Two-Blue coats filming the arrest (captured in the Sun Arrest Footage); he is still clutching his white thing.

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All that remains to be done in our analysis of the crowd is take a look at other behaviour that recommends to us that what we see at Woolwich is a sort of theatre. First of all, there is the man who has been nicknamed Two-Blue Coat, who carries with him a phone on which he films some of the happenings. Rather bizarrely, this man is carrying with him something that looks completely out of place. It is a thin sheer-white, rectangular object, and it actually looks like a set of papers that have been stiffened with a cover.

We can track the whereabouts of this individual not only by how and where he appears in other film clips, but by what he filmed himself. We know, then, that he was on the corner on the barracks side at the same time as The bald man watching Adebolajo talking to the Donnellys. We know that he had followed the bald-man across to the other kerb to film Adebowale talking to Ingrid Kennett – he couldn’t for some reason, get to front for that and we saw lots of people’s feet instead. As Adebolajo is ranting at the bus, we see Two-Blue Coat crossing back over the street to take up another perspective – accompanied by Cream Hoodie as the reader will recall. These two reunite after the police shoot out, again as we’ve already seen.

Fig. 201 – three figures crossing the road at the same time – left to right: the man in the leather jacket, Two-Blue Coat, and the shopping trolley lady.

Fig. 201 – three figures crossing the road at the same time – left to right: the man in the leather jacket, Two-Blue Coat, and the shopping trolley lady.

Two-Blue Coat gives us a great example to explore the concept of compartmentalisation – which is crucial to pull off a false flag or a hoax. If we think that Two-Blue Coat and Cream Hoodie know each other, then perhaps we might not be wrong. However, the footage also showed us police shouting at Two-Blue Coat, and Tina Nimmo for that matter, when they encroached too close to the “emergency medical procedures” on the two Michaels. It looks as if Cream Hoodie knows Two-Blue Coat, and the ARV police, bit they don’t know each other. The natural question for people who don’t understand the dynamics of such an operation is if they are all in the conspiracy together, then why do they not know each other? The answer is: here is evidence of compartmentalisation. Cream Hoodie is a higher operative who knows other operatives who know him, but don’t know each other. The lower level people might even never understand that there is a conspiracy because they never confer with other operatives on their level – only to one person higher up the chain who instructs them. Anyone in the crowd who is an operative might not know that the police are the same, and vice-versa. This structure means that an individual will not get a sense of the overall picture – which might not appeal to him if he did.

Fig. 202 – the girl with the orange head-scarf; loitering at the rear of the lorry. The Nimmo’s car is still in its first position.

Fig. 202 – the girl with the orange head-scarf; loitering at the rear of the lorry. The Nimmos’ car is still in its first position.

Fig. 203 – the girl with the orange head-scarf now decides to walk down Artillery Place.

Fig. 203 – the girl with the orange head-scarf now decides to walk down Artillery Place.

Another character of interest was captured in Two-Blue-Coat’s photography – this is the black girl with the brown-orange head scarf. She is discovered behind the white lorry and crossing over the road to the other kerb. This was sometime before the Nimmo’s car had moved because the shot shows it still in its first position. This means that the incident is past the 11-o-clock and into the 8-o-clock stage according to the ‘bumper clock’. This woman of course is famous for being one of the people who passed Adebolajo as he pontificated at the bus. However, her progress from the back of the lorry to the bus wasn’t straight forward. At one point, she is captured in the Mirror Footage on the corner at the barracks side before Adebolajo’s rant (see Fig. 195). Adebolajo is still talking to the Donnellys, so if she wanted to get down Artillery Place, this would have been a good time. However, this woman has decided that she isn’t going to go anywhere, and she waits. In fact, she does more than that. Standing on the edge of the crowd, she seems to be holding something in both of her hands, and holding it up in the air. Could it be a camera? Could it be that she is filming Adebolajo? But let’s not pass on this character by noticing that this woman has been in location for quite a long while. The Nimmos car moves at “8-o-clock” and before that we see her “in the wings” behind the lorry – she is on the corner at “6-o-clock” while the Donnellys are still on site talking to Adebolajo. She finally moves down Artillery Place when Adebolajo is by the bus. If she was organically moving through the landscape, surely she would not be this belaboured about it?

Fig. 204 – the shopping trolley woman waits “in the wings”.

Fig. 204 – the shopping trolley woman waits “in the wings”.

Fig. 205 – shopping trolley woman being followed by the leather jacket man she followed across Artillery Place.

Fig. 205 – shopping trolley woman being followed by the leather jacket man she followed across Artillery Place.

Fig. 206 – leather jacket man has recognisable shows – see Fig. 207.

Fig. 206 – leather jacket man has recognisable shows – see Fig. 207.

Fig. 207 – leather jacket man standing next to one of the fluorescent jacket boys.

Fig. 207 – leather jacket man standing next to one of the fluorescent jacket boys.

There are other people who are filmed walking past Adebolajo who have also been in no previous hurry to do so. Perhaps the most iconic was the woman pulling a shopping trolley. This woman can clearly be seen standing on the kerb outside the shop while Adebowale starts his rant. There is also another chap wearing all black with leather jacket of the same colour. We know that he was on the corner outside the shop because in Two-Blue Coat’s Camera Phone Footage, we can see his unmistakable shoes. Noticeably, he his standing close to one of the men wearing a fluorescent jacket and appears to be facing him – it might well be that the two know each other.

. 208 – the man with the black leather jacket stops as he gets to the kerb…

. 208 – the man with the black leather jacket stops as he gets to the kerb…

Fig. 209 - … and waits before he steps in the access road. Is this normal?

Fig. 209 – … and waits before he steps in the access road. Is this normal?

A fascinating phenomenon involving these two characters occurs when Adebolajo is ranting at the bus – it is caught by Sun Footage. It happens not long after Cream Hoodie has crossed the road and after that single arm pokes out from behind the lorry (see Figs. 164d & e)). A few seconds later, the trolley lady, and the man in black, and the Two-Blue Coat cross over the road in close succession. The latter of these ambles down the road eventually to film part of the arrest. As we know, the other two go on to walk past Adebolajo – but a curious thing happens. Although the black leather jacket guy crossed the road ahead of her, it’s the trolley lady who sets off down the road first – there may be nothing in this; it could just be accidental. What is strange is what happens after that. The trolley lady does nothing out of the ordinary – except calmly walk past a murder suspect. The man, who is following not too closely on her heels, does something really odd. He stands on the kerb, and doesn’t start to cross until the trolley lady completes her crossing. We can’t say that he was waiting to see what happened to her as she passed Adebolajo, because he starts to cross before that. He looks, instead, as though he is moving according to a timing – which is completely unnatural. Furthermore, as he crosses he undoubtedly monitors Ingrid Kennett who then moves to intercept him, and seems to alter his pace to allow this to happen (see Fig. 206).

Fig. 210 – the cameraman who filmed all the waiting period, the shootout, and the arrest – but whose film is nowhere to be found.

Fig. 210 – the cameraman who filmed all the waiting period, the shootout, and the arrest – but whose film is nowhere to be found.

Fig. 211 – Heneghan leaving court – he looks like he’s wearing a watch – but then millions of others do.

Fig. 211 – Heneghan leaving court – he looks like he’s wearing a watch – but then millions of others do.

Fig. 212 – Heneghan’s profile – certainly has a beer belly.

Fig. 212 – Heneghan’s profile – certainly has a beer belly.

Fig. 213 – notice the shape formed by the chin and the line of the cheeks – compare with Fig. 210.

Fig. 213 – notice the shape formed by the chin and the line of the cheeks – compare with Fig. 210.

The next character we are going to look at is quite different from the rest because he doesn’t need tracking around the landscape to study any peculiar behaviour that he might demonstrate. In fact, he doesn’t really indulge in any activity that might readily cause raised eyebrows. He is the camera man in the crowd at the bottom of Artillery Place who has already been mentioned. Except for the fact that footage catches him pointing up the road on the arrival of Cream Hoodie and the other plain-clothed policeman, he could be easily overlooked. Then again, as has also been pointed out previously, his film – he appears to be filming rather than taking photographs because there is little activity other than pointing the camera – has not seen the light of day. People have all sorts of reasons for producing any kind of photographic or filmic material and then sharing it, or not as the case may be. It just seems odd, however, that such an important piece of historic documentary evidence has never been released.

Fig. 214 – man standing on wall with camera – candidate for official Sun photographer.

Fig. 214 – man standing on wall with camera – candidate for official Sun photographer.

There is another good reason for giving this man a mention because of the following reason. The author was looking for James Henegan in the footage. As we will see, James Heneghan hung around after his initial exposure to what was going on – he stayed and watched the police engage the two Michaels. James Henegan is a big man, and possesses quite distinctive features. He appears to have a dramatic beer belly – this is the only way to describe the sudden overhang from his slimmer looking legs. He has quite a peculiar square-shaped head, and a very distinctive chin that is very sharp, with quite a bit of doubling underneath it. His nose doesn’t form a right angle with the skin above his lips, but it sticks down over his mouth instead – like a carrot fixed in the forehead at a bad angle.

Fig. 215 – the person on the far left is the grey-cap wearing individual who may have captured his/her own footage.

Fig. 215 – the person on the far left is the grey-cap wearing individual who may have captured his/her own footage.

The point is, it occurred to the author that we should perhaps see Heneghan, somewhere – he was on site for the whole duration. He didn’t go home like Wilders did. He stayed on the scene. At the same time, the author was wondering about the guy doing the filming – and an idea was formed. There is no way, of course, that we can accuse the camera man and Heneghan of being one and the same person, but it would do no harm to print some images of the two together so that readers can rule out the possibility. Now it occurs to the author that these two men have similar looking chins, and similar sized bulk at the front in the same beer-belly way. The camera man looks like he has a weird kind of flat nose that doesn’t stick out very much from any degree of side profile, and Heneghan might even be wearing a watch on his left hand in that shot of him exiting court. However, lots of people share the physical features mentioned – and they also wear watches. Then, of course, there is the very different kind of mental character that the two men must possess – while James Henegan blubbed on the Iain Dale show as he recounted events of the day, and also cried in court in front of all the learned gentlemen, the camera man stayed steady and seemingly unaffected as he filmed two men apparently being gunned down by police.

Fig. 216 – after the shootout, mystery football-top wearing cameraman is hanging out with the individual in the grey cap.

Fig. 216 – after the shootout, mystery football-top wearing cameraman is hanging out with the individual in the grey cap.

There were other camera operatives who we don’t know anything about – but let’s just mention one we do and introduce the others as we deal with the issues as we arise. Dominique Kipre claimed to be on a bus going to a job interview – this must have been the Number 53 because it is from outside the door of this bus that he filmed Adebolajo close up. Kipre cannot be seen on the Mirror Footage filming Adebolajo. If one looks at the three perspectives of the Adebolajo speech, the ITN-Kipre Footage is filmed from the right hand side, while the Sun Footage is filmed with Adebolajo looking directly into camera – that perspective also seems from a slightly higher point. The third footage is filmed from the left hand side. This means that in the Mirror Footage, we only get to see the third camera man. This is a character that looks like he is wearing a grey cap. In a black coat and blue jeans, this character will also be revealed to be carrying what could be described as a purse for men.

Fig. 217 – Kipre first appears anywhere in footage as if he walked down John Wilson Street. He claims to have been on the bus.

Fig. 217 – Kipre first appears anywhere in footage as if he walked down John Wilson Street. He claims to have been on the bus.

After the police shootout this character is then found on the junction with John Wilson Street with the camera man in the football shirt. While the latter is bolder, the former hangs back and apparently continues to film – more footage that has never been seen, by the way. At the same time, Kipre emerges from behind the bus – and in fact his appearance is weird because he seems to have come from around the corner; he is a long way behind the bus, and the people who follow him are definitely coming from around the corner. Perhaps this is where they all ran to when the armed police arrived. Kipre is wearing a blue top and cream Farah coloured trousers. He is quite timid at first, but eventually approaches quite close to film the armed police working on the two Michaels before the other police arrive to shoo everyone off the green. Kipre also captures this moment close up and in it he remonstrates with police and talks about their taking 30 minutes to respond to the situation, and also about how a British soldier was now dead. Of course, the 30 minutes is a reflection of Kipre’s time on the scene – if he was on the bus as he said he was, then the armed police arrived 30 minutes after the bus arrived. As for the information that a soldier had been killed – this is what Adebolajo has told him – so we can see that Adebolajo’s speech was about priming later eye witness accounts.

Fig. 218 – Kipre gingerly makes his way across the road to join other familiar filmists.

Fig. 218 – Kipre gingerly makes his way across the road to join other familiar filmists.

It appears that the author of the Sun Angel Footage could be a character who is seen kneeling on the wall by the bus obviously holding a camera to his face. This character has got a shock of black hair, and is wearing a black top with grey stripes by the shoulders. We don’t see him anywhere else – except perhaps we see him capturing his own coat as he holds the camera capturing the Bus Footage. This would mean that this character got back on the bus. In fact, if this guy is the producer of the Sun Footage we know he got off the bus because he is seen doing that in his own footage. The high quality of the Bus Footage, and the fact that some of it is full screen as opposed to contained in a strip which is the way the main Sun Footage is formatted, would also explain why there are really good quality photos of Adebolajo that were released by the Sun. These images seem to be cropped from mobile phone footage because the moments coincide. However, the photos cannot be taken with a mobile phone. It could quite possibly be the case that this character used a high quality camera and the footage was manipulated to make it look like it had been shot by a phone (look at the difference in quality between Fig. 178, and any still from the Sun Angel Footage. The image in Fig. 178 was published by the Sun as a picture to accompany an article, everything else is a still from the video footage – and the difference in quality is quite noticeable). Don’t forget, this Sun Footage camera man is the one who Adebolajo directed his rant at. It starts to look as if people were prepared with some very good equipment which produced such good material that it had to be toned down for the sake of the plausible story of a man with a camera phone filming the incident. To this day it is quite possible that the corporate-media had never altered or updated the narrative that the filming of Adebolajo was done by one man – Dominique Kipre; and it seems that we can’t even prove by other footage that he was next to the bus at the same time as Adebolajo was.

Fig. 219 – seemingly only at the end of the incident do most people in the bottom crowd get their cameras out.

Fig. 219 – seemingly only at the end of the incident do most people in the bottom crowd get their cameras out.

Finally, there is lovely cameo in the footage by a mother and her two children. They are seen in the Camera Phone Footage walking past the camera man as if having just come from down Artillery Place. The “bumper clock” is at 6-o-clock, and Amanda and Gemini are on their feet and it won’t be long before Adebolajo leaves them to go across to the bus. In fact, in the ITN-Kipre Footage, they are in the background when he does in fact leave that side of the kerb. So, the footage is quite clear. This mother and children walked up Artillery Place to go along Rectory Place – perhaps to the school?

Fig. 220 – the mother hauls her two children past the crime scene – no one attacks them.

Fig. 220 – the mother hauls her two children past the crime scene – no one attacks them.

Fig. 221 – mother and children continue along the far side of Rectory Place – no one attacks them.

Fig. 221 – mother and children continue along the far side of Rectory Place – no one attacks them.

They couldn’t have come from west of Rectory Place because what would they be doing further down the hill than the road they required. They had to have walked past the bus, and directly in front, albeit on the other side of the road, of Adebowale and Adebolajo. There is a cut in the Mirror Footage – well a number of them – when it shows Adebolajo talking to the Donnellys, and it is entirely possible, and the author thinks it almost certain, that this is due to fact that it would have shown a mother and two children walking past the death scene, and not really being affected in any way by it.

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