37 – Tina and Michelle Nimmo

Fig. 173 – in the aftermath: the Astra has gone, but Tina Nimmo is still there – inside the outer police lines - having a chinwag with the authorities (see close-up in Fig, 174).

Fig. 173 – in the aftermath: the Astra has gone, but Tina Nimmo is still there – inside the outer police lines – having a chinwag with the authorities (see close-up in Fig, 174).

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The “Woolwich Angels” was a name ridiculously attributed to several women to invoke ideas of nursing in a time of war heroism about them. These women were said to have approached Lee Rigby’s body in order to give the man succour – even though he were apparently already dead. In the immediate aftermath these women were identified in the corporate media as Ingrid Loyau Kennett, Gemini Donnelly, and her mother Amanda Donnelly. To people who were struggling to make sense of this event, it was a great mystery as to why these particular women had been singled out for recognition, but two others had not been.

The blonde woman in black who caused incredulity by being in close vicinity to the armed police as they fired weapons, but especially the girl with a denim jacket who was also seen in the footage around Lee Rigby – these two people’s names were not known. They hadn’t been feted like the others. Why not?

Fig. 174 – blond head and black poncho – this is Tina Nimmo still on scene in the wind-down.

Fig. 174 – blond head and black poncho – this is Tina Nimmo still on scene in the wind-down.

Four days after the incident, the Daily Express[1] named Tina Nimmo as the fourth Woolwich Angel, and reading that article is very interesting in the light of what was said in the trial. Readers can pick the inconsistencies out at their own convenience if they care to peruse the said article – the least that will be mentioned here is how any mention of Nimmo’s 8 month old granddaughter being in the car seemed to be omitted from the trial testimony – it’s perhaps not surprising given that Michelle Nimmo, Tina’s daughter, was found in imagery standing over Rigby’s body as well (see Fig. 23, for instance). Still, the tale of “Michelle, with her baby in the car, scream[ing] at her mother to come back to the car” was still an unofficial reality in December 2013 when mother and daughter did an interview with ITV.[2]

There is one point to the Nimmo’s advantage in contrast to the other “Angels”: we know when the Nimmos arrived on the scene because we can see their car come to a halt in the Shop Footage. We also know that their car is theirs because in the footage we see Michelle Nimmo standing by the driver’s door. We never, however, see Tina Nimmo exit the vehicle, as she is said to have done, and then move down the road to address the other “Angels” or even the perpetrators.

The first time we see Tina Nimmo and can clearly recognise her isn’t until much later in the duration of the incident. We know this because of how the “bumper clock” is at 8-o-clock; in fact, as she first appears and lingers on the left hand side of the screen, Adebolajo kicks the “bumper clock” to 6 – its final position while the incident is still ongoing. It’s safe to say that Tina Nimmo seemed to be stationed at the foot of Artillery Place. As mentioned above, there is no footage that establishes her as doing what the other “Angels” are doing – or even communicating with them. The fact of Nimmo’s distance from Rigby and the other “Angels” must have been considered by someone as being problematic on the run-up to the trial, because at trial it came out that Tina Nimmo thought she was controlling the crowd – not very successfully, evidently – at the bottom of Artillery Place:

She [Nimmo] warned others, “Go back, he’s got a gun, go back” but many of them ignored her and came to watch.’

Dramatic final seconds of Lee Rigby’s life: Jury sees video showing moment before he was mown down in car and hacked to death ‘like a piece of meat being butchered’[3]; Chris Greenwood et al; 29 November 2013.

That was just one of many examples of statement that were supposed to demonstrate Nimmo’s purpose that day. But let us be clear that the footage doesn’t even prove she arrived at the scene with her daughter Michelle as is claimed, because it never shows her exiting the vehicle.

We’ve already discussed Tina Nimmo’s movements during the police engagement, and then during the arrest, and these early ones are equally strange. If Nimmo said n her trial testimony that she thought she was controlling the crowd, then perhaps actually she was – but not in the same way as we are meant to understand it. The reader should make of that what he or she will.

Fig. 175 – the Nimmo’s Astra has moved (compare with Fig. 181).

Fig. 175 – the Nimmo’s Astra has moved (compare with Fig. 181).

Yes, the Nimmo’s are quite the enigma from careful scrutiny of the footage. When, for instance, did it appear in their testimony that Michelle drove her Astra up Rectory Place, turned it around again to return to Artillery Place? It didn’t, of course, but that is what she did during the course of the waiting period of the incident. We can draw on the footage as evidence. The Camera Phone Footage captures a moment when the operator is pointing his camera down Artillery Place to look at Adebolajo talking to the Donnellys (see Fig. 175). The absence of the Astra from the vista is perhaps not automatically apparent, but it has gone nevertheless. The perspective that the cameraman has allows him to take in more than half the truck; we should expect to see the Astra parked in front of it. We can find the same moment on the overhead Mirror footage – in this the “bumper clock” is at 6, and Adebowale is talking to Ingrid Loyau Kennett. So we know, prior to this moment shown in Fig. 107, that Nimmo was lurking in the wings down the road as the Donnellys were preparing to leave, and Adebolajo was about to approach the bus. It is highly significant that what you weren’t allowed to see during this moment from the overhead vantage point was the space where the Nimmos’ car was meant to be. Because it wasn’t there any more.

So this is very odd. If Michelle Nimmo was so concerned at her mother coming back to the vehicle, why did she drive off without her? In counter argument, one could say that she didn’t actually drive too far – and we know that she didn’t because the car is visible at another location in the footage, the ITN-Kipre Footage to be precise (see Figs. 176 & 177). There is something that the reader needs to know about this footage. Some of it didn’t get shown in the ITN news reports immediately, but turned up later in other programmes – it became stock footage used during the trial, or it turned up in a programme that was made later called Crimes that Shook Britain: Lee Rigby. Some footage was shown on CNN and not on ITN. One version of the footage to be found on YouTube had no commentary over it – although it still had the logo engrained on it, it was as though ITN had released it raw, so to speak. The point is, that to collect as much of this footage as possible, the author had to look far and wide for it.

Fig. 176 – does this picture show Adebowale communicating with Michelle Nimmo in the Astra?

Fig. 176 – does this picture show Adebowale communicating with Michelle Nimmo in the Astra?

Back to the point at hand, amongst all the “extra” footage just mentioned, the author found a scene that shows the crash with the “bumper clock” at 8-o-clock and Adebolajo crouching down on the blind side of the Tigra. When he gets up during the course of the video we can see that he has probably been inside the drivers’ side of the vehicle. Adebowale stands near the rear wheel on the same side. The Donnellys are there, but Amanda is getting up from where she had famously been sitting behind Rigby’s body. Kennett is on the bus-side of Rigby, so she has yet to travel up towards the truck into a position that we are more familiar seeing her in, and the Donnellys have yet to travel down the kerb to meet and talk with Adebolajo – which they will do presently. In the background, going along Rectory Place at a crawl, is a black people carrier. In fact, it looks very much like Michelle Nimmo’s car, and what is more, Adebowale sees it and starts walking towards it onto the corner pavement as if to make a beeline for it.

This car has to be the Nimmos’ because other cars have not been able to pass through the area since it closed down. In fact, footage that has been weaved in to that “Crimes that Shook Britain: Lee Rigby” programme abovementioned leaves little doubt: it clearly shows that the driver has a head of blond hair – as does Michelle Nimmo.

Fig. 177 – moments after the scene shown in Fig. 178; the Astra moves further up Rectory Place, and we can definitely see a blond head through the driver’s window.

Fig. 177 – moments after the scene shown in Fig. 178; the Astra moves further up Rectory Place, and we can definitely see a blond head through the driver’s window.

Furthermore, the Astra was perfectly placed to swing around and get up Rectory Place: it could also have driven back out of Rectory Place through the same gap – but having done this manoeuvre it would not have been able to achieve its first parking place by dint of being too far up the road. Hence, it just parked further up the road – and Michelle perhaps just hoped that no one had noticed? Unfortunately, later moments in footage support the fact that Michelle Nimmo moved her car – when you see it in all the shots while Adebolajo is pontificating at the bus, it is much further past the truck than it initially had been; in fact, it is exactly where it might have been had it pulled out of Rectory Place. So it looks like the Astra drove off and was out of Artillery Place sometime prior and possibly close to the time Amanda Donnelly stopped sitting by Lee Rigby, and before Adebolajo begins his rant by the bus. It was back in Artillery Place at around the same time as or before Adebolajo begins his rant. We don’t have a way to gauge how long this was in terms of minutes and seconds; we don’t have footage of the Donnellys leaving, nor the Astra returning, and we never see Adebolajo cross the road to begin his pontificating.

Fig. 178 – Parked further up the road, Michelle Nimmo, pointing in the direction of Rectory Place. Why?

Fig. 178 – Parked further up the road, Michelle Nimmo, pointing in the direction of Rectory Place. Why?

Moreover, of course, we don’t know what Michelle Nimmo was doing – the least we can say is that it doesn’t really look like the actions of a daughter wanting her mother to return to the safety of the car. It’s another moment that brings doubt about the Nimmos and the veracity of their story, and suspicion regarding their real motivations. The author has to be careful making outright accusations, but the reader can surely come to his or her own conclusions about what the Nimmos were doing that day. The trouble for the Nimmos is that there are so many of their abnormal moments – the strange behaviour and presence of Nimmo the Elder in the core of the action during the shootout, and perhaps none more so incriminating than photography and footage that appears to show both of them as being familiar with a plain clothed policeman.

In addition, their testimony doesn’t add up. How likely is it really that they saw the Michaels attacking Rigby given that they came so late? Why did Michelle see Rigby lying on his front? There are facts relating to their movements that day that didn’t come out in the testimony – these facts cast long shadows of doubt on the prima facia reasons why the Nimmos were even there. The video also strongly suggests that Nimmo wasn’t organising people who were trying to get off a bus, nor was she making contact with any of the other main participants who have been called “Woolwich Angels”. We have already concluded that the whole incident was a contrived event to make the public think that a soldier called Lee Rigby had been murdered by jihadists. The reader must come to his or her own mind regarding to what extent, if at all, the Nimmos are involved in this conspiracy.

Fig. 179 – two circles of cordon – one at the bottom of Artillery Place, and a closer one across the top of Wellington Street.

Fig. 179 – two circles of cordon – one at the bottom of Artillery Place, and a closer one across the top of Wellington Street.

But it has to be admitted, from a neutral standpoint, there is a weight of suspicious behaviour that might make the reader lean in a certain direction. And in fact there is one last piece of evidence which the reader needs to see in order to make up his or her mind. It is perhaps the most suspicious activity that Tina Nimmo was seen engaging in – that and it’s place in the chronology is why this information has been left to the very end. Fig. 173 is an image shown in a Channel 4 report, date of first broadcast unknown, that can now be seen on YouTube under the title “British soldier beheaded on busy London street in terror attack”[4]. It obviously shows the junction between Artillery Place and Rectory Place after everyone has been cleared out and the police have fully moved in to the area. A cordon is seen in the image, but this is an inner cordon. We know that there is one further up Rectory Place the likes of Joe Tallant have to stand to be interviewed because the media isn’t allowed past it. We also know that there is another official outer cordon right at the end of Artillery Place at the junction with Frances Street. Fig. 179 demonstrates that layers of official cordon were set up all around the incident at the eastern end of Artillery Place, and if the reader peruses the image in Fig. 238 he or she will see the public excluded from the junction to the north. The public just didn’t get to stand within the police cordon. And yet Tina Nimmo can clearly be seen in Fig. 173 (there is a close-up in Fig. 175), standing within an outer cordon. Notice the Astra is nowhere to be seen, so if Michelle and Tina did come together in the car, then it didn’t matter if Tina didn’t get wherever they were going in the end.

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[1] http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/402674/The-angels-who-stood-guard-over-soldier-s-corpse

[2] http://www.itv.com/news/2013-12-20/it-doesnt-leave-you-woolwich-witnesses-haunted-by-memories-of-attack/

[3] http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2515700/Lee-Rigby-Woolwich-murder-trial-CCTV-footage-shows-split-second-soldier-hit.html

[4] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_B7Yu_ChO3Y