36 – Cream Hoodie, the Plain Clothed Policeman

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When we look at individuals who were caught on camera being components of the greater crowds discussed above, there is one that we must look at first because they draw a connecting thread between many other individuals in the scene, and the apparent connection casts a huge shadow of doubt with regards who they are claiming to be or who we might just take them for. By default we think that most people who were caught on camera that day are just innocent bystanders, or witnesses who became familiar to the public in name, face or both.

This fellow of most interest was wearing a cream off-white hoodie, blue jeans and white shoes on the day – we’ll call him Cream Hoodie and his movements will be reported in the present tense as though we are all watching the footage together. So, to begin it is quite possible that we first see this character far in the background as Adebolajo pontificates to all those camera operators down by the bus (see Figs. 161 – 166). He is crossing the road in front of the Nimmo’s car, to disappear behind the white lorry. He is carrying something in his left hand – something clearly white, or light-coloured. Remember, this character is not necessarily exactly the same man that can be identified in other images by his facial features (as will be explained). However, the colour combination of his clothes and his behaviour suggests that he is one and the same.

Crossing in front of him is a man wearing a coat that has light blue arms against a blue body (or is it a blue shirt under a body warmer?). These two are clearly together because just before the pair disappear behind the white truck, the second man looks back at Cream Hoodie. In turn, the Cream Hoodie has finally caught up, and seems to be addressing him. So this is the first of the branches that our “plains clothed policeman” produces. This first man has been nicknamed Two-Blue Coat, and the reader will have come across that name used before in this book. There is a figure that emerges from the other side of the truck towards the end of Adebolajo’s rant which could be Cream Hoodie – please notice the group of people congregating there – one of them is Amanda Donnelly, but we’ll get on to this shortly. Before that, there is a moment where an arm emerges from behind the lorry and does some pointing and gesticulating. Could it be the arm of Cream Hoodie?

Fig. 161 – Cream Hoodie, circled left, and Two-Blue Coat right.

Fig. 161 – Cream Hoodie, circled left, and Two-Blue Coat right.

Fig. 162 – Two-Blue Coat turns to look at Cream Hoodie.

Fig. 162 – Two-Blue Coat turns to look at Cream Hoodie.

Fig. 163 – Cream Hoodie has caught up – Two-Blue Coat is still looking at him; they must be communicating.

Fig. 163 – Cream Hoodie has caught up – Two-Blue Coat is still looking at him; they must be communicating.

Fig. 164 – an arm extends from behind the lorry – pointing.

Fig. 164 – an arm extends from behind the lorry – pointing.

Fig. 165 – the same arm – so captured as it was being raised.

Fig. 165 – the same arm – so captured as it was being raised.

Fig. 166 – Cream Hoodie continues onto the other side.

Fig. 166 – Cream Hoodie continues onto the other side.

The first time that we see Cream Hoodie at a bit closer range is when the ARV police are administering first aid to Adebowale and Adebolajo. Cream Hoodie and another man appear from seemingly out of nowhere and arrive at the side of the police. Presumably, if the guy at the top of the hill is the same man as this one, then he quite feasibly travelled down Rectory Place and the back of Elliston House. His approach at the bottom is captured on the Mirror footage, but interestingly enough, just as him and his friend are about to interact with one of the police, the camera moves so that this meeting is out of shot, and we largely miss it. Luckily, other footage captures it. There seems to be a brief conversation between the police and these two men, and the policeman points up the road. The two men run off, and as they do, a female voice is heard on the Sun Arrest Footage – perhaps it is D49 – to say “er, guys”. This must be aimed at the two newcomers, and has a note of warning in it – the meaning of it is not at all clear, but the author felt it worthy of note because D49 had previously been screaming like a harpy at other people to “stay back”. One of her male companions had also told people to “stay back”. However, these two men were treated very differently, and were allowed to approach the suspects, and were familiar with the police. That’s why Cream Hoodie must be a plain clothed policeman.

Fig. 167 – the man in the tracksuit is pointing as Cream Hoodie and his mate approach the Adebowale.

Fig. 167 – the man in the tracksuit is pointing as Cream Hoodie and his mate approach the Adebowale.

Before we move on covering Cream Hoodie’s progression through the film – two significant moments must be recorded. As Cream Hoodie and the other fellow approach the ARV police, a member of the bottom crowd who has ventured closer to police than most and appears to be filming events, points up the road. This fellow had been on scene for a long time – he can be seen in the iconic image where Adebolajo is talking to Ingrid Loyau-Kennett. He wears tracksuit pants and what looks like a football shirt – he also wears a cap. Strangely enough, his footage never appeared to make it to the light of day. In any case, he noticeably does not point at any other time except when Cream Hoodie and his friend appear on the scene. This sudden animation must be for the benefit of the two newcomers – and bizarrely enough, he appears to be pointing directly at Tina Nimmo who has once again encroached near the core of the crime scene.

In what is one of the strangest coincidences ever to happen in the history of the humanity, Nimmo appears to be waiting for Cream Hoodie and his friend. Indeed, she may even beckon them with her hand as they run towards her. Drawing level, she then seems to point up the road, and she turns as they come past her, and then runs after them up the hill. Unfortunately, but perhaps not unsurprisingly, the full extent of this encounter has been omitted by the Mirror Footage with some very skilful pointing of the camera so as to avert the scope away from the area of the meeting. (This happens a lot with this particular film, and we must assume that a considerable expert is operating it). Once again, we are lucky that enough bits of this coincidence are captured on various bits of other footage so that it didn’t get forgotten about.

Fig. 168 – the policeman attending Adebowale points when Cream Hoodie and his mate approach.

Fig. 168 – the policeman attending Adebowale points when Cream Hoodie and his mate approach.

What then goes on up Artillery Place when Cream Hoodie and his friend reach there is not shown on any film in any useful way – it occurs in the background of the ITN-Kipre footage, but not very distinctly. The best illustration is given by the stills introduced in Chapter Six. These are photographs of a group of people standing around the body of Lee Rigby. A chapter is dedicated to most of these people in due course, but for the time being please note, in these stills, more branches of association between supposed innocent characters and Cream Hoodie are created.

The next time we see Cream Hoodie is when he is escorting several people down the southern pavement of Artillery Place (as mentioned above). These are people who had been standing amongst the crowd at the top of Artillery Place, and they are quite recognisably so. He steers two people with his arms on their shoulders – one of them is Two-Blue Coats – and then a third.  That this moment has been captured on film is in fact crucial. It contains one of the details that tells us, without a doubt, that the Woolwich incident was theatre, and not a real event.

Fig 169. After having come out of the blue, Cream Hoodie and mate are allowed to stand in the crime scene.

Fig 169. After having come out of the blue, Cream Hoodie and mate are allowed to stand in the crime scene.

The keener-eyed observers of this incident noticed that after the bus’ first reversal to make room for the police ARV, the doors were against a barrier on the kerbside of the pavement (see the Fig. 144 series of images, for instance). It reversed again just before the paramedics arrived so that the door was level with the gap in the barrier that coincides with the pedestrian crossing. Funnily enough, this bus was now perfectly placed for what would thereafter ensue – which was the emptying from the scene of the crowd. Cream-Hoodie is involved in this activity personally, but he is not just generally shooing people away as the regular police are. Instead he is directing his charges to the bus – and putting them on it. The Fig. 279 series of images clearly shows that someone has got on the bus after being delivered there by Cream-Hoodie. Furthermore, the series of images collectively called Fig. 278 show a moment just before the paramedics arrive when someone can be seen moving into the entrance area of the bus in order to get off of it – to try and hide this, the Mirror Footage was spliced at that moment. The film bleaches to white where it has been cut and pasted to omit a very small section. A good few seconds pass because before the flash the first paramedic car is absent from the scene; after the flash, the car is pulling up on the other side of the central island and is coming to a halt.

The old adage is that where there is proof of a cover up, there is proof of a conspiracy: obviously the people who released this footage wouldn’t want us to see Cream-Hoodie putting people on the bus, and they wouldn’t want to help us notice by allowing us to also see that the bus had been moved specifically to facilitate access on and off of it. In the light of this evidence, the bus is clearly for moving actors to and from the scene. It may be that there are innocent people on that bus who would be desirable for some plausible deniability (who knows how they came to be on it – we can’t know the intricate details of how this bus came to the scene). And evidence of that is supported by an interesting moment in the Bus Footage in which a woman can be heard saying “sorry [or it could be a name that sounds like the word], let her off – sorry, let her go”. This person sounds like she might be organising the driver, and therefore controlling access to the scene from the bus and vice versa. This would not, of course, suggest an organic situation.

This is strange. It sounds as if there is a person on the bus who is giving orders to others regarding whether or not passengers can get off the bus. If it is the case, then the bus irrefutably becomes a prop in the theatre having been identified as another branch of association with the plain clothed policeman Cream Hoodie.

Fig. 170a - Cream Hoodie and friends going to the bus.

Fig. 170a – Cream Hoodie and friends going to the bus.

Fig. 170b - Now he's got his left arm on the hooded fellow who is in the iconic photos of people around Rigby's body.

Fig. 170b – Now he’s got his left arm on the hooded fellow who is in the iconic photos of people around Rigby’s body.

Fig. 170c - further investigation shows that some of these people must get on the bus.

Fig. 170c – further investigation shows that some of these people must get on the bus.

Fig. 170d - packing 'em in.

Fig. 170d – packing ‘em in. It’s fairly clear that Cream Hoodie is interacting in that bus exit area.

Fig. 170e - it's fairly clear that Cream Hoodie is interacting in that bus exit area.

Fig. 170e – seemingly getting off the bus himself.

Fig. 170f - passes the uniformed policeman - nobody bats an eyelid.

Fig. 170f – passes the uniformed policeman – nobody bats an eyelid.

Fig. 170g - now he's all in the paramedics' business.

Fig. 170g – now he’s all in the paramedics’ business.

Fig. 170h - finally, he looks for all the world as if he is heading to the boot of the ARV.

Fig. 170h – finally, he looks for all the world as if he is heading to the boot of the ARV.

When Cream Hoodie steps back into the road after delivering his consignment to the bus – or thereabouts – he passes a uniformed policeman who doesn’t react to his presence, but who does directly go and accost some other character who has strayed onto the scene and is wandering up the road. This is another indicator that he is a known presence to the more readily identifiable authorities. At this stage he is in the vicinity of Adebolajo, and he pulls something out of his pocket. It is quite possibly the other blue surgical glove to the one that he dropped on the floor – he did this on his first pass through the area before he ran up to Rigby. Now he clearly bends over to pick the object up, and puts it on his hand. Why would he wear these gloves other than to interact with objects in the crime scene? Our suspicions are confirmed by an image that is shown in Fig. 169 – here Cream Hoodie is standing amongst the devastation with a uniformed policeman nearby clearly not caring about this interloper and his mate will do before forensics reaches the location. It begs the question, who is he exactly, or who does he think he is, that he has the authority to do this? Well, the answer is someone who has so far been seen to be very comfortable arranging and directing actors in an extravagant exercise to pull the wool over the eyes of the British public – of course he’s going to touch the crime scene. Maybe this is how all the additional blood gets to appear on the ground.

Fig. 171 – Tina Nimmo has been waiting for Cream Hoodie and his mate.

Fig. 171 – Tina Nimmo has been waiting for Cream Hoodie and his mate.

Fig. 172 – as Cream Hoodie runs past her, Nimmo actually seems to point up the road.

Fig. 172 – as Cream Hoodie runs past her, Nimmo actually seems to point up the road.

The Mirror footage ends as Cream Hoodie heads towards the ARV – perhaps he is going to help himself to something from the boot? The last time we see him is in a still from the tail-end of the film that the Mirror’s sister paper, the Record released. Lee Rigby’s body is covered with a red blanket. Amazingly, no paramedics are near the unattended body, but good old Cream Hoodie – along with his companion – are in very close proximity. Notice, the last paragraph ended by predicting that Cream Hoodie would touch the crime scene. In any case, the least we can say of Cream Hoodie is that he had the run of the crime scene in the aftermath. He was someone closely involved in the running of the operation.

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