34 – Missing Action

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When the IPCC did its investigation of the weapons discharge by police, and the greater incident, it had to this to say:

The investigation was assisted greatly in that it was captured entirely by local authority CCTV. IPCC investigators were aided further by additional mobile phone footage recorded by eye-witnesses.

By laying the CCTV footage and mobile phone footage we had the opportunity to view the incident as it unfolded…

It is clear the officers had seconds to assess the rapidly escalating threat posed, not only to themselves, but also to the many members of the public who had gathered or were walking along the road.

IPCC investigation concludes Metropolitan Police firearms officers acted appropriately to dangerous situation in Woolwich[1]; Press Release; 19 December 2013.

Fig. 148 – the still released instead of moving footage showing Adebolajo with his feet facing up the road.

Fig. 148 – the still released instead of moving footage showing Adebolajo with his feet facing up the road.

The footage being referred to is principally the Mirror Footage and the Council Footage, and if the investigators at the IPCC were worth their salt, they would have come to the conclusion that the video had been doctored. We’ve already discussed a blemish in the Mirror footage – a splice that, as it turns out, cuts out what maybe some very crucial information. The cut in the CCTV footage has always been there to see. As mentioned in the relevant chapter in the first part of this book, there are clearly two parts to this footage separated by stills. The first part ends as Adebolajo hops into the air in close proximity to the police car. The second part starts as Adebowale is on the floor with the three cops around him; D49 is about to draw her weapon. Missing time is supposedly accounted for with five stills taken from the same camera. The first is a shot of Adebolajo with his feet facing up the road – this is the one that has yet to make an appearance in this book, so it is here duly reproduced as Fig. 148. The second is a still of Adebowale running under the road sign, with his legs looking as if they are about to give way (Fig. 125). He can be seen pointing his weapon. The third is of Adebowale as he is falling on the floor close to the spot he was in the previous picture (Fig. 126). Then there are two stills showing Adebolajo on the floor prior to his thumb apparently being shot off (Fig. 136 and 138). The second part of the footage rejoins the same scene after Adebowale has apparently had his thumb shot off. Presumably, the whole point of the splice and cut is the fact that it would have shown Adebowale’s thumb not being blown off. So much for the IPCC using the footage to investigate to the correct conclusion. There is another flaw with the footage, which will be investigated in the Part Six of this book to do with the timestamps on it.

This chapter is about explaining the splice in the Mirror Footage. If we take the example of the Council Footage, it must be there to hide something that we aren’t supposed to see. Our first hypothesis about this should be that it is related to the fact that a paramilitary police office was initially seen getting out of the car. However, there is more to it than that. Just like the IPCC, the author used an overlaying of all the available footage to try and get to the bottom of what was going on, and unlike the IPCC, discovered that a portion had been cut and discarded from out of the Mirror Footage – not once, but twice – both most definitely to hide from the viewer material that they were not supposed to see. Most remarkably of all was how this exercise revealed that all of the footage related to this moment in the incident had been edited so as not to reveal the glaring anomalies.

To illustrate the problem it is easiest to study the progress of Michael Adebolajo. In the Mirror footage he leaps away from the car, and if we inch through the film frame by frame, we see his legs disappear out of shot. Another second passes, and the blemish in the film happens, and then Adebolajo is back in shot – but he isn’t doing what we should expect him to do. Adebolajo is in the process of sitting up, with his legs pointed toward the kerb, in order to roll to his right and achieve his final position.

Remember, there is no equivalent of this in the Council Footage – it cuts out before Adebolajo does his leap. However, we do see the still of Adebolajo presumably as he lands from his leap – face down, with his legs pointed into the middle of the road. As mentioned above, there is very little time when Adebolajo is out of shot in the Mirror footage. Are we sure he was able so quickly to scramble forward x-amount of feet and rearrange himself so as to bring his feet around in front of him and then sit down again – which is how we find him?

To understand what is going on, we can inspect the timestamps on the CCTV footage. At the point that the first phase ends, Adebolajo is jumping in the air in close proximity to the car – this isn’t the actual flying leap that sends him off screen, but we can use the moment to synchronise the Mirror Footage with the Council Footage. This leap happens at 14:34:12 (and 1 tenths). The still image where Adebolajo is lying in the road feet inwards is timestamped 14:34:13 (and 9 tenths – although actually it is stamped with 12 tenths – it’s a freak feature of the display, but it has been decoded into real time by the author). The gap is 1 second and 8 tenths.

If we look at the Mirror footage at 1.7 seconds past the initial bunny hop, Adebolajo leaves the scope of the shot. Theoretically everything seems to be in order. At 2.6 seconds past the initial bunny hop, the camera has panned so that we can see Adebolajo. Surprisingly, he has changed his position. No longer does he have his legs facing down and into the road, but now they are facing the kerb at right angles. In fact, at this stage, Adebolajo seems to be sitting up and about to roll to his right to lie flat on his face. What the Mirror Footage seems to be telling us, therefore, is that Adebolajo rearranged himself in 0.8 seconds. Is this possible? In fact, there is a bit more to it than that yet.

At 2.5 seconds after the initial bunny hop, the scope of the camera pans so that in the road we can see the knife that Adebowale was carrying as he approached the car. Just to be clear: this knife is the knife that Adebolajo swapped from his left into his right hand after he had dropped the cleaver.

Fig. 149a – the knife is visible, even though we can’t see Adebolajo.

Fig. 149a – the knife is visible, even though we can’t see Adebolajo.

Fig. 149b – Adebolajo is revealed – moving into a sitting up position.

Fig. 149b – Adebolajo is revealed – moving into a sitting up position.

Fig. 149c – inconvenient blurriness.

Fig. 149c – inconvenient blurriness.

Fig. 149d – Adebolajo still pulling himself up.

Fig. 149d – Adebolajo still pulling himself up.

Fig. 149e – now seated.

Fig. 149e – now seated.

Fig. 149f – starts to roll to his right.

Fig. 149f – starts to roll to his right.

Fig. 149g – Adebowale should be getting tasered around about now.

Fig. 149g – Adebolajo should be getting tasered around about now.

Fig. 149h – adopting his final position.

Fig. 149h – adopting his final position.

The big issue about this is this: if one looks closely at the still of Adebolajo with his feet into the road (Fig. 148), it is clear that that knife is not there. This was a genuine surprise to the author. The assumption that had always been made is that Adebolajo must have thrown this knife away as he was flying through the air – he had just been shot, and so maybe it became a priority for him to lose the knife, the object that was attracting hostility. Or even if he didn’t think logically, then surely there would be a good chance that some natural reflex would have caused him and the knife to become separated.

However, as far as things had developed according to the still in Fig. 148, at this stage Adebolajo must still have had the knife in his possession. We must assume that during the rearrangement of himself so that his turned his body around to point feet into the kerb, he also cast the knife away.  When it would have been most conducive to do this as he was doing something equivalent to floor gymnastics is not easy to tell, but perhaps this isn’t the point. The point is that Adebolajo did a lot of fidgeting for someone who had just been shot, and who risked been shot again, and it was none of it caught on camera – though it should have been. The question is, how much time does this fidgeting represent? There must be missing time because otherwise, given that we can see the knife 2.5 seconds after the bunny hop, it took Adebolajo all of 0.7 seconds to rearrange himself and have the knife in place on the road. This is even more unfeasible than the previous case.

There is more evidence that missing time has elapsed in the form of the progress of the man in black who had been standing by the two perpetrators and who walked along the wall to hide on the green. He clearly skips ahead.

Additionally, there is the “smoking gun” of the missing soundtrack from the Mirror Footage. Usually, one can hear audible noises emanating from the scene being filmed as one watches this footage. This includes a distinctive pattern of gunfire that sits astride the splice. It has a characteristic rhythm and timing that is repeated in the Sun Video footage precisely. Two shots are fired before the splice – the ones aimed at Adebolajo – then the next volley contains four shots in its own cluster with its own pattern.

Fig. 150 – a map of D49’s prowling around Adebolajo.

Fig. 150 – a map of D49’s prowling around Adebolajo.

The gap between these volleys remains constant in both videos, so this presented a mystery. If time was cut out of the Mirror Footage across the splice, then there should be a variance in the period between the volleys as heard on the Mirror Footage in contrast with the Sun Arrest Footage. This is explained by the “smoking gun” anomaly. About four seconds after the last shots of the third volley are fired, the soundtrack on the Mirror Footage fades out, and its stays quiet for 5 seconds. We know it disappears because whereas the screaming and shouting in the scene was clearly audible, now there is no noise whatsoever. It doesn’t do this anywhere else in the footage. As mentioned previously, there is always noise – whether it be car horns, or even the wind in the trees. When the sound comes back we can hear D49 screaming instructions at Adebolajo: “do not move; do not move your hands; inaudible; put your hands where I can see them”.

Luckily, other footage, in this case the Camera Phone Footage, can be analysed to follow D49’s movements and what she said in what position as she circled Adebolajo. This is how the author came up with the diagram in Fig. 150. On her way to position A) D49 sad “do not move your hands” – as she confirmed in her testimony. In fact, this is what she repeatedly told Adebolajo – and what she mostly told him, except for a few variations and interjections which characterise her movements. At A) she bossily insists “put your hands where I can see them”. Moving to B) and arriving she barks another two “do not move your hands”. At C) she shouts “do you hear me, do not move your hands”.

Using this, we can confirm that the sound comes back on the Mirror Footage as D49 moves into position A), and that it is what we would expect to hear. This point in the proceedings is about 9 seconds after the last shot was fired. So it’s quite clear that 5 seconds of the Mirror Footage soundtrack had been clipped out before it was released to the public. The reason for doing this was so that the gun fire could remain constant across the splice. Of course, without the cut in the soundtrack, it would have got ahead and out of synchronisation with the visuals.

There is further incriminating evidence. The Sun Arrest Footage does not show any of the gun fight – at all. Instead we only see the arm of the man holding the camera. This is highly suspect in the first instance. We do, as mentioned above, get to hear the gun shots. Then, when the sound is missing from the Mirror Footage, for most of that duration the Sun Arrest Footage has been discarded – we don’t get to hear what has been rubbed from the Mirror Footage. This is a clear sign of a deliberate effort to conceal that there is something missing from the Mirror Footage. To demonstrate that it is not a coincidence, the Camera Phone Footage also only starts roughly about the same time as the soundtrack comes back on the Mirror Footage. The only other film that covers that period is the Council Footage, and that has not got a soundtrack. It looks very much like three bits of footage have been manipulated so that one can never contradict the other – this is hugely suspicious.

Finally, when the Mirror Footage is compared to the Council Footage so that the latter’s timestamps can be applied to the former, it appears that the 2nd part of the Council Footage starts 4 to 5 tenths of a second before the corresponding moment appears in the Mirror Footage. This more than likely means that the time stamps in the stills were manipulated so that they stayed comparative to the Mirror Footage and hid the fact that a chunk had been taken out.

All this means that all the footage that shows the gun fight and its immediate aftermath has either had bits cut out, or commences strategically from a certain point in the action, to cover up the fact that some information was cut from the Mirror Footage. Evidence of a cover up, which this undoubtedly is, is evidence of a conspiracy. The author feels that what was cut out of the Mirror Footage must be something to do with the rogue shooter who shouldn’t be there, and/or with what Adebolajo was up to after he had thrown himself into the road. The solution is not entirely clear, and this is mostly because the way the splice does really seem seamless. Two realities are brought together in such a n expert way that, although we can see the splice by a hiccup in the footage, and we can see clearly a different before and after in terms of content, we still can’t see the join. All we can say is that there is a major anomaly, and the people behind it organised the footage released to the public, and to court, to hide it.

To summarise this part dedicated to the police “shootout” as a whole, it looks as though the police engagement with Adebowale and Adebolajo was a staged event, and the protagonists were merely players. Because the proceedings were fake, it is not surprising that something would happen that would not seem organic – namely, whatever Adebolajo did after he landed from his leap. While the manipulation of the footage provides evidence for a cover up, it also covers up directly – or attempts to – the lie that Adebowale’s thumb was shot off. This is clearly not the case, and is evidence amongst other clues that live rounds were not used by the police. The fate of Adebowale’s thumb was a fact stated in court – like other lies about this incident  – but it differed because it was the most easily denied. That the defence teams did not contend this “fact” shows that the trial was a total sham. The conspiracy to deceive the public about a murder to a British soldier therefore extended to include certain people in the justice system as well as the police. Moreover, if we want to know why the IPCC could not discover the inconsistencies that laymen can find for themselves, then we should extend the conspiracy to include that august body.

Finally, if there was no real incident of police arresting suspected perpetrators of a crime – if it was theatre – then there was no real crime in the first place. There was only a conspiracy to present a street drama and pretend that a crime had taken place. We’ve noted that police, and legal professionals are amongst the conspirators – and now suspicion must fall on some of the witnesses and protagonists on scene on the day because without their contributions the narrative could not have developed, and the myth of the death could not have been so soon established, and there could be no pretence of a trial if there were not statements from members of the public declaring that they had seen a murder.

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[1] https://www.ipcc.gov.uk/news/ipcc-investigation-concludes-metropolitan-police-firearms-officers-acted-appropriately