31 – The Case for Blanks and Fake Police

Fig. 123 – while Adebolajo and Adebowale are arrested and patched up; the state of the ARV’s doors.

Fig. 123 – while Adebolajo and Adebowale are arrested and patched up; the state of the ARV’s doors.

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Before we get into the meat of this chapter, we need to be establish a more precise account of what happened after Adebolajo is shot for the first time. It’s not clear really whether or not it’s that first shot, or the second one aimed at him, that is supposed to have made him spin once clockwise and then throw himself head first away from the car into the middle of the road. The second shot supposedly aimed at him sort of coincides with this leap. Meanwhile, Adebowale had been lumbering down the pavement and he got towards the bottom of the Elliston House compound wall with his right hand raised, with the gun that he and Adebolajo shared between them in it. The footage is very blurred at this point and it is hard to see what happens to the fellow. That Adebolajo is lying in the road is that much clear.

We’ve already looked at the witness testimony about events up to this point, but there is a problem in the physical evidence that doesn’t account for this first discharge of weapons. There is precious little room inside a car to wield a rifle. And if we are supposed to believe the official narrative, then we must believe that E48 fired a rifle from inside the car because that is the weapon he immediately emerged with. However, we do not see the rifle protruding from the window – which suggests that E48 fired his rifle from further inside the car. Would this be feasible? In fact, could any shot have been feasible? After the rear passenger door on the driver’s side shuts, it becomes apparent on the Mirror Footage that it is wound to the top – it is closed. Other footage was examined to confirm this, and in the Sun Arrest Footage a glimpse could be had of the driver’s side passenger window.

Fig. 124 – Adebowale approaches the rear door from the blind side. If the window is not open, the shot could be impossible.

Fig. 124 – Adebowale approaches the rear door from the blind side. If the window is not open, the shot could be impossible.

This image is shown in Fig. 123, and it shows a transparent space where the window is. A quick inspection on the internet shows that Metropolitan Police ARV’s do not necessarily have their rear windows blackened so that they aren’t transparent – so this window is not necessarily open. However, what clinches it is the fact that we can also see blue light in that space. The source of this light must be the flashing blue lights on top of the ARV, and arguably, we are seeing them in this space because they are being reflected off of a closed window Therefore it becomes quite the mystery how Adebolajo could have even been shot at from inside the car. Adebolajo is coming at the rear driver’s side door from completely the wrong angle for anyone to shoot from while it is the ajar position, as the simple diagram in Fig. 124 seeks to explain. This is the first evidence for the use of blank bullets. If E48 had fired live rounds into the ground through the gaps that were available to him, just to make the noises of gunfire, then he ran the risk of an innocent by-stander getting hit with one – eventually. In such a situation, it may have taken a freak accident for the bullet to ricochet suitably enough to hurt someone, or fall out of the sky on top of someone’s head, but surely the chance could not be taken. Instead, E48 was able to shoot radomnly.

Fig. 125 – a still that was released in lieu of moving pictures from the Council Footage.

Fig. 125 – a still that was released in lieu of moving pictures from the Council Footage.

The second volley of shots started around about this time, but maybe this is jumping the gun. E48 and D49 had advanced from the driver’s side of the car, and E42 had advanced from the other so that they form a triangular formation with E48 between the other two. D49 had by now apparently fired her Taser at Adebolajo, and it had hit him in the chest and in the leg – at least this is where we were told in trial that the cables connected. Watching the footage, it wasn’t clear when this Taser had been fired. Indeed, one could not be very sure about who had supposedly shot at Adebowale either, but the information from trial tells us that it was E42.

Fig. 126 – another of those stills that were released to account for omitted footage – this one follows from the image in Fig. 125.

Fig. 126 – another of those stills that were released to account for omitted footage – this one follows from the image in Fig. 125.

As mentioned previously, the only material that shows this engagement, the Mirror Footage, is awful – perhaps so much so that the Metropolitan Police felt it had to release stills from the Council Footage in which Adebowale was supposedly being shot. These images do help, especially overlaid with the Mirror Footage. Figs. 127 and 128 are two stills from that footage showing what was happening on the sounding of the first and last shots of the second volley – the 3rd and 6th shots over all. The positions of the police and Adebowale in this image seem very much to coincide with the same in the 14:34:15.12 (sic) time- stamped Council still. What is especially noticeable in the Mirror Footage still is the visible black-trouser leg sticking out at a strange angle in front of the body. This information is telling us that despite four bullets fired at him, Adebowale did not go down, but instead continued to stumble a further, perhaps, 10 feet down the road.

Fig. 127 – first shot of the second.

Fig. 127 – first shot of the second.

Fig. 128 – last shot of second volley.

Fig. 128 – last shot of second volley.

In court it was said that it was E42, the man from the passenger side, who shot Adebowale. This would certainly have to be the case from looking at the images because these show that D49, with a Taser as well of course, was not even looking at him throughout the entire second volley, and E48, who wasn’t looking at him either, would have had to fire close to D49, if not through the arms.

There are two issues emerging from all this. Firstly, how was it that Adebowale was impervious to the hollow point bullets fired by a supposed crack shot specially trained government enforcer? Secondly, why did the other two armed police not even register the second man on the scene? E48 implies in his testimony that he saw two men from the outset, but his actions suggest that he clearly did not.

We’ll come back to the first point right at the end of the chapter. So, dealing with the second point for now, E48 presented this rationalisation for his actions in court:

“He is still a threat. Until he is disarmed and handcuffed he still gets my attention.”

Video: Shocking moment Lee Rigby’s alleged killers charge armed police with deadly weapons[1]; Adrian Shaw; 03 December 2013.

This statement is an elaboration upon the idea previously established of E48’s being entirely focussed on Adebolajo. However, E48 also seemed to contradict himself later on in his testimony:

I know [sic] become aware of the second male… pointing a firearm. He was clearly a greater threat.

Recap: Lee Rigby trial updates as police officer tells court of moment she thought she would be killed[2]; Paul Cockerton; 03 December 2013.

Fig. 129 – Adebowale is on the ground, D49 still has a Taser.

Fig. 129 – Adebowale is on the ground, D49 still has a Taser.

We need to understand this correctly to picture the imbecility of the so-called police hotshots. The ARV team were advised that there were two men on scene, one had a gun. E48 got out of the car and shot Adebolajo – the one with the knife. He fell away into the path of another armed officer coming from around the other side of the vehicle – arguably, E42 could have dealt with him – especially if the team communicated amongst themselves – which they pointedly did not do. In any case, that would have meant that the one with the knife had been put on the floor and covered. That would leave the one with the gun still in the vicinity and on his feet – in particular, a man approaching on the same side of the vehicle that E48 he was on. If we are supposed to believe that a highly trained police marksman did not understand that he needed to stop focussing on a target that had been dealt with, and look for another target who his training obviously told him is a greater threat (we can surmise this to be the case – he basically parroted it to us in court), then the police are obviously too incompetent to carry fire arms, and the public should demand them made inaccessible to all police. Essentially, what E48 did was trundle about for many seconds in Adebolajo’s cross hairs like a sitting duck. So did D49, who even fired her Taser at the already prone Adebolajo rather than disabuse herself completely of the useless instrument and arm herself with a weapon with which to deal with the greater threat.

Remarkably, D49 did not see Adebolajo until he was lying down by the road sign by the pedestrian crossing at the bottom of Artillery Place – that’s how obtuse she was. This is what she said:

I was so focused on suspect one that it was only when I heard further shots I saw the other man. He had a gun in his hand.

Recap: Lee Rigby trial updates as police officer tells court of moment she thought she would be killed[3]; Paul Cockerton; 03 December.

“I thought: ‘Oh my God, he’s going to shoot me.’ I feared for my life.”

She said the second man had a silver gun pointing in her direction.

“I threw my Taser to the ground and drew my Glock and pointed it at the suspect. I heard shots,” she said, adding that she may have ducked, fearing the suspect was shooting at her. “I saw the gun dropped from his hands.”

In fact, a colleague called E42 had opened fire.

Lee Rigby attacker rushed at officer with machete, court hears[4]; Vikram Dodd et al; 03 December 2013.

Fig. 130 – the moment of the last volley of shots. E42 missed once at this range.

Fig. 130 – the moment of the last volley of shots. E42 missed once at this range.

Only when all the perpetrators were dealt with did D49 think it a good idea to deploy her pistol. Remember, the volley of shots being referred to is the third one. D49 didn’t notice Adebowale until after E48 had fired 4 times at him. What had happened by then was that E48 and E42 closed in on Adebowale, who had finally, like some lumbering great beast, succumbed to the gnat stings of police and put himself on the floor – conveniently not too far away from Adebolajo so that both men could be caught in the same camera shot presumably. Incidentally, to do this E42 had to move in front of D49 and therefore her Taser cable, which didn’t present any kind of inconvenience judging by the footage. The court reporting said that the last two shots emanated from E42.

Here is another citation of D49’s testimony about this tail end incident with a little more detail:

The second suspect was lying on the ground. “I felt like everything was in slow motion,” she said. “In his right hand he turned the silver handgun in my direction and seemed to rotate it very slowly.

“I thought, ‘Oh my God he is going to shoot me’ and I feared for my life. I heard shots, I thought I ducked as I thought he was firing at me. But I saw the gun fall from his hand and he was incapacitated by shots fired by E42 and/or E48.”

Lee Rigby murder trial: CCTV shows moment police shoot armed men in Woolwich street after the killing of soldier[5]; Paul Cheston; 03 December 2013.

Fig. 131 – D49 has her handgun drawn at last – the incident is over.

Fig. 131 – D49 has her handgun drawn at last – the incident is over.

Fig. 130 shows the moment of the 7th shot, and indeed D49 does appear to be ducking. However, the Taser has still not been dropped. During the previous few seconds she had been fumbling with it (see Fig. 129), and she hadn’t been looking at Adebowale, and didn’t until the other police dealt with him. Obviously the testimony about slow turning guns was elaboration of fabrication once again to further instil the idea of the damsel in distress. Finally, D49 reacts to the gunfire by pointing her Taser in the vague direction of Adebowale, and this provides a great clue by which the author finally concludes that D49 is not a real police woman. If she were real specially trained police, she would not be so concerned with appearances for the sake of the integrity of a gender-equality promoting narrative about the brave sacrifice of a model woman. She would not be thinking about how to fool casual observers into believing that she was playing an integral role in the shooting of Adebowale using a Taser that had already been fired (it could be a multi-shot one), and from several yards behind other officers obstructing her from a clear shot. D49 is a fake. She would perhaps be aware of the ridicule that she would be held in by fellow professionals. Likewise, by his judgements, E48 demonstrated that he cannot be a real policeman. The shooting prowess, as we are about to get into, also is a point against any of these people trained to fire a weapon. Principally, E48 and D49 are the two who testified in a court of law that they had accosted suspects in the case of the murder of Lee Rigby. The ramifications are obviously clear.

Fig. 132 – the cables cabinet on the green.

Fig. 132 – the cables cabinet on the green.

Finally, we must deal with point regarding how Adebowale was not stopped by the four bullets that were fired at him. Hollow point bullets, which were the round of choice on the day, are designed to stop where they have been fired so that they do not go beyond their target and endanger anyone else. They flatten on impact, and the flattening takes the energy out of them. This means that they do worse non lethal damage than a round that doesn’t flatten. The reports tell us that Adebolajo suffered a wound to his left bicep. Adebowale was hit in the abdomen, thigh and thumb. The basic footage doesn’t show either Adebolajo or Adebowale being hit and producing a splatter of blood – which should be expected. In all the images of Adebowale and Adebolajo, there are no holes evident in their clothing, nor any sign of a wound. A supposed wound to Adebowale in the hand will be discussed in the next chapter. It also should be pointed out that a version of footage of Adebolajo being shot did rounds on the internet in which blood splatter appeared to emanate from his body. This phenomenon is not visible on the original video provided by the Mirror, and therefore is fakery and suggests the determination on the part of that particular image manipulator to have people believe a fiction.

The prosecutor Whittam told the trial jury that “some bullets fired by police missed the two men and struck an adjacent wall and a wiring box that is at the foot of a wall below a block of flats”.

Lee Rigby murder trial: Attack was like a butcher attacking a joint of meat, court told[6]; Adrian Shaw; 30 November 2013.

Fig. 133 – the yellow markers possibly denote the location of bullets.

Fig. 133 – the yellow markers possibly denote the location of bullets.

Images were made accessible to the public of these places where the stray bullets were supposed to have hit. Let’s just start by remembering that there was apparently one stray bullet fired in Adebolajo’s direction, apparently up Artillery Place. Two bullets missed Adebowale before he laid himself down, and one went absent while E48 was trying to shoot him lying down. The picture of the wall shows two evidence markers at its foot and then one way over on the green. If these are marking the final locations of bullets, which is the only apparent reason why police should release it, then arguably the one on the green is the shot that missed Adebowale in the prone position. We could get into nitpicking about whether not this bullet was on the right path or trajectory, but in the end it doesn’t matter.

Fig. 134 – damage to a clay brick from a bullet fired from 25 meters away.

Fig. 134 – damage to a clay brick from a bullet fired from 25 meters away.

In the picture of the wall, the two evidence markers sit roughly beneath two green arrows further up in the brick that presumably point to where the bullets hit. There are two problems, if the cabinet around the corner was hit as well, which bullet is supposed to have hit it? Secondly, there is nothing on the wall that looks remotely like a bullet hole. The image in Fig. 134 is from a Canadian police study into the damage caused to every-day masonry by fire arm projectiles entitled “Resistance of Exterior Walls to High Velocity Projectiles”.[7] Various different calibre rounds were fired at walls made of different materials all from 25m away – that’s 82 feet. The Heckler and Koch MP5 carbine used by the Metropolitan Police fires a bullet with a 9mm diameter, length 19mm. In the Canadian test, the .308 Winchester round – and this is presumably just a standard one – of diameter 7.8mm, length 51mm, created in a clay brick a hole of 3 and a half centimetres in diameter and penetrated to two thirds of the bricks thickness.

Fig. 135 -  a close up of the wall where two bullets were supposed to have hit.

Fig. 135 – a close up of the wall where two bullets were supposed to have hit.

In comparison, the marks on the wall at Woolwich look like thumbnail scrapes. Again, we must remind ourselves that the wounds to the two Michaels would be horrific (and well deal with that in the next chapter). However, there is no sign on them of having been hit by a devastating bullet.

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[1] http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/lee-rigby-murder-trial-video-2879808

[2] http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/woolwich-trial-live-lee-rigby-2878015

[3] http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/woolwich-trial-live-lee-rigby-2878015

[4] http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2013/dec/03/lee-rigby-attacker-machete-court

[5] http://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/lee-rigby-murder-trial-cctv-shows-moment-police-shoot-armed-men-in-woolwich-street-after-the-killing-of-soldier-8980026.html

[6] http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/lee-rigby-murder-trial-attack-2866873

[7] http://www.interpol.int/Media/Files/INTERPOL-Expertise/IGLC/Resistance-of-Exterior-Walls-to-High-Velocity-Projectiles-%E2%80%93-Technical-Report-CPRC